AP: Real issues facing Pennsylvania ignored


Story Transcript

JULIE PACE (VOICEOVER): For nearly two months, Democrats Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama have bowled and barhopped their way through Pennsylvania. Now the state’s April 22 primary is finally within sight, and voters here say election day can’t come soon enough.

BOB SENSKE, PENNSYLVANIA VOTER: I want them to finally pick a candidate and get on with it.

STEPHEN MARTIN, PENNSYLVANIA VOTER: You know, I just get to the point where if it’s on, I just don’t listen, I don’t care, I just let it go by.

PACE (ON CAMERA): This wasn’t what was supposed to happen here in Pennsylvania. Most people expected both parties would have their nominees chosen by now. Voters here say they’ve never seen the state receive so much attention, and they’re ready for their time in the spotlight to end.

STEVEN METZ, PENNSYLVANIA VOTER: Oh, it’s starting to be a real nuisance on the TV and everywhere you turn around and look. Go out your front lawn and see your lawn littered with signs all over the place. I mean, you didn’t give nobody permission to put them there. It’s getting to be a harassment.

PACE (VO): When campaigning in Pennsylvania began, Jenny McCraw had a list of reasons to pay attention.

JENNY MCCRAW, PENNSYLVANIA VOTER: I have two boys in college, I have a mortgage, and I just went on unemployment ’cause I lost my job.

PACE: But the issues have often been sidelined by controversies like statements made by Obama’s former pastor and Clinton’s exaggerations about the danger she faced on a trip to Bosnia while first lady. It’s left some Democrats looking for another option.

METZ: Between Obama and Clinton, it’s getting to be such a sideshow it’s enough to make you go Republican, heaven forbid.

PACE: That’s exactly what the Democratic Party is fearful of come November. Julie Pace, the Associated Press, Philadelphia.

DISCLAIMER:

Please note that TRNN transcripts are typed from a recording of the program; The Real News Network cannot guarantee their complete accuracy.


Story Transcript

JULIE PACE (VOICEOVER): For nearly two months, Democrats Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama have bowled and barhopped their way through Pennsylvania. Now the state’s April 22 primary is finally within sight, and voters here say election day can’t come soon enough. BOB SENSKE, PENNSYLVANIA VOTER: I want them to finally pick a candidate and get on with it. STEPHEN MARTIN, PENNSYLVANIA VOTER: You know, I just get to the point where if it’s on, I just don’t listen, I don’t care, I just let it go by. PACE (ON CAMERA): This wasn’t what was supposed to happen here in Pennsylvania. Most people expected both parties would have their nominees chosen by now. Voters here say they’ve never seen the state receive so much attention, and they’re ready for their time in the spotlight to end. STEVEN METZ, PENNSYLVANIA VOTER: Oh, it’s starting to be a real nuisance on the TV and everywhere you turn around and look. Go out your front lawn and see your lawn littered with signs all over the place. I mean, you didn’t give nobody permission to put them there. It’s getting to be a harassment. PACE (VO): When campaigning in Pennsylvania began, Jenny McCraw had a list of reasons to pay attention. JENNY MCCRAW, PENNSYLVANIA VOTER: I have two boys in college, I have a mortgage, and I just went on unemployment ’cause I lost my job. PACE: But the issues have often been sidelined by controversies like statements made by Obama’s former pastor and Clinton’s exaggerations about the danger she faced on a trip to Bosnia while first lady. It’s left some Democrats looking for another option. METZ: Between Obama and Clinton, it’s getting to be such a sideshow it’s enough to make you go Republican, heaven forbid. PACE: That’s exactly what the Democratic Party is fearful of come November. Julie Pace, the Associated Press, Philadelphia. DISCLAIMER: Please note that TRNN transcripts are typed from a recording of the program; The Real News Network cannot guarantee their complete accuracy.