Colombian GM Workers Engaged in 5-Year Long Protest

Story Transcript

GREGORY WILPERT, TRNN: Welcome to the Real News Network. My name is Gregory Wilpert and I’m coming to you from Quito, Ecuador.

In Colombia right now, employers are promoting two bills that would enable corporations to fire injured workers. It’s a serious issue for the workers there, and also they are facing this situation at the same time that still one activist in Colombia is being murdered, at the rate of one per week, which is [an] incredible rate for a country that is supposedly respecting human rights.

With us today is Frank Hammer, who just recently returned from a trip to Colombia. He is a retired auto worker from Detroit, longtime UAW union member and continues to work as a labor activist. Thanks for joining us today, Frank.

FRANK HAMMER: Thank you.

WILPERT: So, first of all, let’s just get up to speed as to what you saw when you went to Colombia. You met with General Motors workers there. What were they telling you as to what the main concerns were in terms of their conditions and their organizing activities?

HAMMER: Yeah. So this was my second visit to Bogotá, Colombia, the first one being in 2013. I was there with a delegation to try to [inaud.] solidarity with workers who had been injured on the job at the GM assembly plant in that city who were subsequently illegally discharged by General Motors. This was occurring in the hundreds, and this particular group of workers, going by the name of ASOTRECOL decided to fight back, and their means was to establish a tent encampment in front of the US Embassy, their reason being that at that time the US had a major shareholder stake in the company, and they figured that under the Obama administration they would be able to influence General Motors to do the right thing.

So when I visited them most recently their tent encampment is still in front of the US Embassy. GM and other injured workers are manning the tent. [They were reaching] their 1,709th day as of April 1. We’re well into the fifth year of the tent encampment. So their protest is over the firing of injured workers, and demanding that GM respect the rights of injured workers by putting them on jobs they can do or, in the case of ASOTRECOL, if not that to compensate them in the form of workmen’s compensation, disability so that they could go on with their lives despite their injuries which prevent them from securing any other kind of employment.

So this is the battle that’s been waged over the last, like I said, four, five years, and my involvement in this battle date back to April of 2012. So my visit recently was actually celebrating the fourth anniversary of my getting involved, and also many US activists getting involved and lending this group of workers solidarity that has really emboldened and strengthened their struggle to continue for the long haul.

WILPERT: Well, let’s look at the different elements that are at play here. I mean, one is, of course, the role of the Colombian government. The other is the role, or the responsibility, of the US government, and third would be the role and involvement of General Motors itself. What is it–I’ll just start with the last [inaud.] election with the US government first. What is it they’re hoping to get, exactly, with this encampment? What would they like the US government to be doing that would change their situation?

HAMMER: So, back in 2012 there was an attempt at a mediation, they called it a mediation, I don’t know if it actually earned that name, but it was called a mediation. And it was abruptly discontinued by General Motors after the GM injured workers rejected what General Motors determined to be a final offer, and so immediately the injured GM workers, according to [inaud.], have been seeking a resolution, a settlement with General Motors via the mediation route, and the embassy, from time to time, has probed with GM Colmotores, the plant there, and by and large GM has continued with impunity, rejecting any efforts to mediate a just settlement for the workers.

WILPERT: So, is there anything that unions in the US are doing or can be doing in order to help them, or, in terms of the solidarity, is there anything happening in terms of cross-border solidarity?

HAMMER: Yes. Let me respond to that, but I realized I didn’t respond to part of your question, and that is, we need to understand that what I’m describing, and I’ve learned that the presence of firing injured workers is an epidemic in Colombia, and the workers at the encampment have sort of, because of their visibility, have strengthened. Like I said, there are a 25 fired/injured workers’ associations now in Colombia who have come to the fore. And all of that is going on in the context of the US-Colombia free trade agreement which was urged for passage back in 2011 by President Obama and then-secretary Hillary Clinton.

And there was a document put together called the labor action plan. The labor action plan was the fig leaf that claimed with, well, now we have labor protections in Colombia, and as you’ve mentioned there’s been continued assassinations. Actually, the month before I was there, there were 30 assassinations in a month of progressive elements in Colombia. And so, the US government, even though it has gotten this labor action plan under the Colombia free trade agreement, is basically shirking its duty and responsibility to ensure that labor rights are being protected in Colombia. That’s where the US government plays, or has not played any kind of significant role.

WILPERT: Right. I remember that back in 2008 when Obama was running for President he was saying that he was opposed to the free trade agreement with Colombia unless something like this labor protection clause was included in the agreement. So, obviously, even though it was included in the end and Obama ended up supporting the free trade agreement, it’s not being enforced.

HAMMER: And it has no enforcement mechanism, and I should point out that, yes, that was a role President Obama, and then-candidate Obama, and of course Hillary was lock stock in step with that, first opposed the Colombia free trade agreement and then, as Secretary of State, pushed it, yes.

WILPERT: So, I just want to get back to the question again. What kinds of cross-border solidarity, if any, is going on, and what workers in the US and solidarity activists in the US can or might be able to do with regard to the situation?

HAMMER: If you pardon me for a second, let me also bring up some new information. So, when I was there I actually had the opportunity to meet with injured workers who are still working in the plant. One of the impacts of this tent encampment is that GM, until now, has not been firing injured workers, and we learned that out of a workforce of 1700 there are over 400 injured workers that are currently employed at the factory not being fired for fear that injured workers who would be fired would be joining the tent encampment.

And to answer to your question, other than the role that the UAW played, initially, in this thing that they called a mediation, [the] labor movement by and large has ignored this struggle, and as a result, as a result of the US labor movement ignoring this struggle by and large, other labor groups in different countries like in Great Britain, even the federation of UNIFOR have also sort of ignored this struggle, so these workers have relied on grassroots support from the US, and I have to say that over these last four years workers have made large donations to sustain them and their families. Various rallies have been held at GM headquarters and different kinds of activity, including showing up at GM dealerships, and this kind of grassroots support has been sort of unexpected in Colombia, you know that US workers and allies would be engaging in support here.

So we hope that this continues, and we think that the labor movement in the US should take note of what’s happening to workers’ compensation, potentially, in Colombia, because what’s going on in Colombia will eventually visit us here, and we know that workers’ comp claims and rights in the US are also under attack state by state.

WILPERT: Well, this is all the time we have for today on this issue, but, I mean, this is certainly another issue that we should be keeping an eye on, especially because, like you mentioned, the situation there, especially with the repression that’s going on against union members is a very serious issue that’s been ongoing and needs to be turned around. So, anyway, thanks so much, Frank, for talking to us about this situation.

HAMMER: I thank you very much as well.

WILPERT: And thank you for watching the Real News Network.

End

DISCLAIMER: Please note that transcripts for The Real News Network are typed from a recording of the program. TRNN cannot guarantee their complete accuracy.

If you would like to donate to ASOTRECOL, you may do so at their website, www.asotrecol.com or, if you would prefer to write a check, make it out to “Wellspring UCC” with “Colombia relief” on the memo line. Checks should be mailed to: Wellspring UCC, Box 508, Centreville VA 20122.

SPANISH TRANSLATION:

GREG WILPERT: ​Bienvenidos a Real News network. Mi nombre es Gregory Wilpert y estoy con ustedes desde Quito,​ en este momento en Colombia, varios empleadores están promocionando dos leyes que permitirán que las corporaciones despidan a los trabajadores heridos. Esto es un problema serio para los trabajadores Colombianos. Porque a la misma vez que están enfrentando esta situación, los activistas están siendo asesinados a una taza de una persona por semana, es un porcentaje increíblemente alto para un país que dice respetar los derechos humanos.

Con nosotros hoy, tenemos a Frank Hammer, quien recién volvió de Colombia. Es un mecánico jubilado de Detroit, fiel miembro de la union UAW, y continúa trabajando como activista de derechos laborales.

Gracias por venir hoy dia Frank​.​

FRANK HAMMER: Gracias.

WILPERT: Entonces, en primer lugar, pongamonos al dia con lo que viste en Colombia. Te reuniste con los trabajadores de General Motors allá. ¿Qué es lo que ellos te contaban y cuáles son sus mayores preocupaciones sobre las condiciones [de trabajo] y las actividades sindicales que están organizando?

HAMMER: Si, fue mi segunda visita a Bogotá, Colombia, la primera fue en 2013. Estuve ahí con una delegación [demostrando] solidaridad con los trabajadores que habían sido heridos mientras trabajaban en la planta de ensamblaje de GM, y quienes subsecuentemente fueron ilegalmente despedidos por General Motors.

Esto ocurría a cientos de personas nacionalmente, y este grupo de trabajadores en particular que se llamaban ASOTRECOL decidió luchar, estableciendo campamentos de carpas al frente de la embajada de Estados Unidos.​ ​En su razonamiento EEUU tenía participación accionarial en la compañía y pensaron que bajo la administración de Obama se pudiera influenciar a General Motors para que haga lo correcto.

Entonces cuando les visité recientemente en el campamento de carpas que sigue al frente de la embajada; estaban dotando de personal al campamento.​ ​Estaban llegando al dia 1709 desde el primero de Abril 2012. Estamos dentro del quinto año de acampada.

Entonces la protesta de ellos es sobre los derechos de los trabajadores heridos y están demandando que GM respete sus derechos; o que les pongan en trabajos que sí pueden desempeñar, como [se dió] en el caso de ASOTRECOL.​ ​Si que no se puede compensar con trabajo entonces que les den pensiones de deshabilidad para el trabajador, para que puedan seguir adelante en sus vidas a pesar de sus heridas, las cuales no les permiten desempeñar ningun otro tipo de empleo.

Entonces esto es la batalla que ha sido librada como dije, en los últimos 4-5 años; y mi involucración en esta batalla se viene dando desde el 2012.

Entonces mi última visita fue en honor al aniversario del cuarto año desde mi involucración y también de la involucración de mis activistas en EEUU que han prestando solidaridad a este grupo de trabajadores que ha fortalecido y ha envalentonado a su lucha, dandole animos para seguir de largo.

WILPERT: Bueno, veamos los diferentes elementos que están en juego aquí, uno claro, es el rol del gobierno Colombiano, el otro rol es la responsabilidad del gobierno Estadounidense. Y el tercero sería el rol e involucración de General Motors…

Empiezo a contar por lo último [inaudible]…GM con el Gobierno EEUU. Qué es lo que están tratando de obtener exactamente, con este campamento? Qué es lo que quieren que EEUU haga para mejorar la situación de ellos?

HAMMER: Entonces en el 2012 hubo un atentado a una mediación, lo llamaron una mediación, no se si en actualidad se merecía ese nombre, pero asi se llamo un mediacion. Y fue abruptamente descontinuada por GM después que los trabajadores heridos de GM no aceptaron la oferta final.

Entonce inmediatamente los trabajadores que fueron heridos {inaudible} buscaron una resolución, un arreglo con GM a través de la mediación, y de vez en cuando la embajada ha consultado con GM Colmotores, la fábrica ahí, y por largo GM a continuado con impunidad, rechazando cualquier esfuerzo para mediar un justo arreglo para los trabajadores.

WILPERT: Entonces no hay algo que las uniones en EEUU están haciendo o que podrían estar haciendo para poder ayudarles, o, en términos de solidaridad. ¿Hay alguna iniciativa de solidaridad que rompa fronteras?

HAMMER: Si, déjeme responder esa pregunta, pero primero, me doy cuenta que no respondí por completo su primera pregunta, necesitamos entender lo que estoy describiendo y he visto en presencia de trabajadores despedidos heridos y es que: esto es una epidemia en Colombia y también que los trabajadores del campamento por su visibilidad se han fortalecido.

Como dije hay como 25 asociaciones de trabajadores heridos y despedidos que han salido a la luz pública. Y todo esto pasa en el contexto del acuerdo del libre comercio entre EEUU y Colombia , que fue instado para su aprobación en el 2011 por Presidente Obama y la entonces secretaria de estado, Hillary Clinton​ yY hubo un documento que compusieron llamado el plan de Acción Laboral. El Plan de Acción Laboral era la “hoja de parra que se cobró con” …bueno ahora tenemos protección laboral en Colombia, pero como tu mencionaste siguen las assasinasiones.

De hecho el mes antes que estuve en Colombia, hubieron 30 asesinatos de elementos progresistas.​ ​Entonces el Gobierno Estadounidense, que si bien ha obtenido el plan activo de protección bajo el tratado del libre comercio, está básicamente evadiendo sus responsabilidades y tarea de asegurar de que los los derechos laborales están siendo protegidos en Colombia.

Es ahí donde el gobierno EEUU juega o no juega un rol significante.

WILPERT: Correcto, yo me acuerdo que en el 2008 cuando Obama estaba de candidato a la presidencia el dijo que no estaba de acuerdo con el Tratado de Libre Comercio entre EEUU y Colombia al menos que se incluyera algún tipo de clausula de protección laboral en el acuerdo.

Entonces obviamente aunque [las cláusulas] fueron agregadas al final y Obama terminó apoyando el acuerdo del mercado libre, no se lo hace cumplir.

HAMMER: Y no tiene mecanismo para hacerse cumplir, y debo señalar, que si… ese fue un rol que el Presidente Obama, el entonces candidato Obama y por supuesto Hilary apoyaron esa idea, al principio se opuso al mercado libre, pero ya de secretaria del estado lo presiono, si.

WILPERT: Entonces solo quiero volver a la pregunta de nuevo, Qué tipo de iniciativa transfronteriza solidaria hay, si es que hay una? Y que pueden hacer trabajadores y activistas solidarios, si es que hay, en EEUU en lo que se refiere a la situación [en Colombia]?

HAMMER: Si es que me perdonas por un segundo, déjame también traer a la luz nueva información.

Entonces cuando estuve ahí, tuve la oportunidad de conocer con trabajadores heridos que todavía trabajan en la fábrica; uno de los impactos de este campamento es que GM, hasta ahora no ha estado despidiendo a trabajadores heridos.​ ​Y aprendimos que de una fuerza laboral de 1700 personas, hay 400 heridos que corrientemente están trabajando sin ser despedidos, por miedo de que ellos se unan al campamento si se les hecha. ​​Y para contestar su pregunta, a de mas del rol que desempeño [el Sindicato NorteAmericano de Trabajadores] UAW, inicialmente, en esta cosa que llamaron mediación.

El movimiento de trabajadores por la mayor parte ha ignorado esta lucha y como resultado, como resultado del movimiento laboral que en EEUU ha ignorado esta lucha, al igual que en otros países como en Gran Bretaña, hasta la federación {inaudible} ha ignorado esta lucha.

Entonces estos grupos han dependido del apoyo de grupos de base aquí en EEUU. Y tengo que decir que en los últimos 4 años los trabajadores han dado grandes donaciones para sostenerlos a ellos y a sus familias. ​​Varias manifestaciones se han celebrado en la sede de GM, y diferentes tipos de actividades incluyendo protestas afuera de varios concesionarios de GM.​ ​Este tipo de apoyo de base ha sido inesperado en Colombia, tu sabes que los Trabajadores Estadounidenses y sus aliados estarían apoyando desde aquí.

Entonces esperamos que esto continúe, y pensamos que el movimiento laboral en EEUU debería tomar notas de lo que puede pasar con las compensaciones de los trabajadores, en Colombia.​ ​Por que lo que está pasando en Colombia eventualmente nos va a visitar aquí y nosotros sabemos que los derechos de los trabajadores ya están siendo atacados estado por estado.

WILPERT: Bueno esto es todo el tiempo que tenemos por hoy en este tema, pero es definitivamente un tema que deberíamos tomar ojo, especialmente como mencionastes la situación alla , especialmente con la represión que se está dando con los sindicatos en actualidad es algo muy serio y que debe cambiar.

De todas formas, muchas gracias Frank por hablar sobre esta situación.

HAMMER: Y muchas gracias tambien, le agradesco mucho

WILPERT: Y gracias por ver the Real News Network.

Spanish Transcript

GREG WILPERT: ​Bienvenidos a Real News network. Mi nombre es Gregory Wilpert y estoy con ustedes desde Quito,​ en este momento en Colombia, varios empleadores están promocionando dos leyes que permitirán que las corporaciones despidan a los trabajadores heridos. Esto es un problema serio para los trabajadores Colombianos. Porque a la misma vez que están enfrentando esta situación, los activistas están siendo asesinados a una taza de una persona por semana, es un porcentaje increíblemente alto para un país que dice respetar los derechos humanos.

Con nosotros hoy, tenemos a Frank Hammer, quien recién volvió de Colombia. Es un mecánico jubilado de Detroit, fiel miembro de la union UAW, y continúa trabajando como activista de derechos laborales.

Gracias por venir hoy dia Frank.

FRANK HAMMER: Gracias.

WILPERT: Entonces, en primer lugar, pongamonos al dia con lo que viste en Colombia. Te reuniste con los trabajadores de General Motors allá. ¿Qué es lo que ellos te contaban y cuáles son sus mayores preocupaciones sobre las condiciones [de trabajo] y las actividades sindicales que están organizando?

HAMMER: Si, fue mi segunda visita a Bogotá, Colombia, la primera fue en 2013. Estuve ahí con una delegación [demostrando] solidaridad con los trabajadores que habían sido heridos mientras trabajaban en la planta de ensamblaje de GM, y quienes subsecuentemente fueron ilegalmente despedidos por General Motors.

Esto ocurría a cientos de personas nacionalmente, y este grupo de trabajadores en particular que se llamaban ASOTRECOL decidió luchar, estableciendo campamentos de carpas al frente de la embajada de Estados Unidos.

​ ​

En su razonamiento EEUU tenía participación accionarial en la compañía y pensaron que bajo la administración de Obama se pudiera influenciar a General Motors para que haga lo correcto.

Entonces cuando les visité recientemente en el campamento de carpas que sigue al frente de la embajada; estaban dotando de personal al campamento.

​ ​

Estaban llegando al dia 1709 desde el primero de Abril 2012. Estamos dentro del quinto año de acampada.

Entonces la protesta de ellos es sobre los derechos de los trabajadores heridos y están demandando que GM respete sus derechos; o que les pongan en trabajos que sí pueden desempeñar, como [se dió] en el caso de ASOTRECOL.

​ ​

Si que no se puede compensar con trabajo entonces que les den pensiones de deshabilidad para el trabajador, para que puedan seguir adelante en sus vidas a pesar de sus heridas, las cuales no les permiten desempeñar ningun otro tipo de empleo.

Entonces esto es la batalla que ha sido librada como dije, en los últimos 4-5 años; y mi involucración en esta batalla se viene dando desde el 2012.

Entonces mi última visita fue en honor al aniversario del cuarto año desde mi involucración y también de la involucración de mis activistas en EEUU que han prestando solidaridad a este grupo de trabajadores que ha fortalecido y ha envalentonado a su lucha, dandole animos para seguir de largo.

WILPERT: Bueno, veamos los diferentes elementos que están en juego aquí, uno claro, es el rol del gobierno Colombiano, el otro rol es la responsabilidad del gobierno Estadounidense. Y el tercero sería el rol e involucración de General Motors…

Empiezo a contar por lo último [inaudible]…GM con el Gobierno EEUU. Qué es lo que están tratando de obtener exactamente, con este campamento? Qué es lo que quieren que EEUU haga para mejorar la situación de ellos?

HAMMER: Entonces en el 2012 hubo un atentado a una mediación, lo llamaron una mediación, no se si en actualidad se merecía ese nombre, pero asi se llamo un mediacion. Y fue abruptamente descontinuada por GM después que los trabajadores heridos de GM no aceptaron la oferta final.

Entonce inmediatamente los trabajadores que fueron heridos {inaudible} buscaron una resolución, un arreglo con GM a través de la mediación, y de vez en cuando la embajada ha consultado con GM Colmotores, la fábrica ahí, y por largo GM a continuado con impunidad, rechazando cualquier esfuerzo para mediar un justo arreglo para los trabajadores.

WILPERT: Entonces no hay algo que las uniones en EEUU están haciendo o que podrían estar haciendo para poder ayudarles, o, en términos de solidaridad. ¿Hay alguna iniciativa de solidaridad que rompa fronteras?

HAMMER: Si, déjeme responder esa pregunta, pero primero, me doy cuenta que no respondí por completo su primera pregunta, necesitamos entender lo que estoy describiendo y he visto en presencia de trabajadores despedidos heridos y es que: esto es una epidemia en Colombia y también que los trabajadores del campamento por su visibilidad se han fortalecido.

Como dije hay como 25 asociaciones de trabajadores heridos y despedidos que han salido a la luz pública. Y todo esto pasa en el contexto del acuerdo del libre comercio entre EEUU y Colombia , que fue instado para su aprobación en el 2011 por Presidente Obama y la entonces secretaria de estado, Hillary Clinton y. Y hubo un documento que compusieron llamado el plan de Acción Laboral. El Plan de Acción Laboral era la “hoja de parra que se cobró con” …bueno ahora tenemos protección laboral en Colombia, pero como tu mencionaste siguen las assasinasiones.

De hecho el mes antes que estuve en Colombia, hubieron 30 asesinatos de elementos progresistas.

​ ​

Entonces el Gobierno Estadounidense, que si bien ha obtenido el plan activo de protección bajo el tratado del libre comercio, está básicamente evadiendo sus responsabilidades y tarea de asegurar de que los los derechos laborales están siendo protegidos en Colombia.

Es ahí donde el gobierno EEUU juega o no juega un rol significante.

WILPERT: Correcto, yo me acuerdo que en el 2008 cuando Obama estaba de candidato a la presidencia el dijo que no estaba de acuerdo con el Tratado de Libre Comercio entre EEUU y Colombia al menos que se incluyera algún tipo de clausula de protección laboral en el acuerdo.

Entonces obviamente aunque [las cláusulas] fueron agregadas al final y Obama terminó apoyando el acuerdo del mercado libre, no se lo hace cumplir.

HAMMER: Y no tiene mecanismo para hacerse cumplir, y debo señalar, que si… ese fue un rol que el Presidente Obama, el entonces candidato Obama y por supuesto Hilary apoyaron esa idea, al principio se opuso al mercado libre, pero ya de secretaria del estado lo presiono, si.

WILPERT: Entonces solo quiero volver a la pregunta de nuevo, Qué tipo de iniciativa transfronteriza solidaria hay, si es que hay una? Y que pueden hacer trabajadores y activistas solidarios, si es que hay, en EEUU en lo que se refiere a la situación [en Colombia]?

HAMMER: Si es que me perdonas por un segundo, déjame también traer a la luz nueva información.

Entonces cuando estuve ahí, tuve la oportunidad de conocer con trabajadores heridos que todavía trabajan en la fábrica; uno de los impactos de este campamento es que GM, hasta ahora no ha estado despidiendo a trabajadores heridos.

​ ​

Y aprendimos que de una fuerza laboral de 1700 personas, hay 400 heridos que corrientemente están trabajando sin ser despedidos, por miedo de que ellos se unan al campamento si se les hecha. ​​

Y para contestar su pregunta, a de mas del rol que desempeño [el Sindicato NorteAmericano de Trabajadores] UAW, inicialmente, en esta cosa que llamaron mediación.

El movimiento de trabajadores por la mayor parte ha ignorado esta lucha y como resultado, como resultado del movimiento laboral que en EEUU ha ignorado esta lucha, al igual que en otros países como en Gran Bretaña, hasta la federación {inaudible} ha ignorado esta lucha.

Entonces estos grupos han dependido del apoyo de grupos de base aquí en EEUU. Y tengo que decir que en los últimos 4 años los trabajadores han dado grandes donaciones para sostenerlos a ellos y a sus familias.

​​

Varias manifestaciones se han celebrado en la sede de GM, y diferentes tipos de actividades incluyendo protestas afuera de varios concesionarios de GM.​ ​

Este tipo de apoyo de base ha sido inesperado en Colombia, tu sabes que los Trabajadores Estadounidenses y sus aliados estarían apoyando desde aquí.

Entonces esperamos que esto continúe, y pensamos que el movimiento laboral en EEUU debería tomar notas de lo que puede pasar con las compensaciones de los trabajadores, en Colombia.

​ ​

Por que lo que está pasando en Colombia eventualmente nos va a visitar aquí y nosotros sabemos que los derechos de los trabajadores ya están siendo atacados estado por estado.

WILPERT: Bueno esto es todo el tiempo que tenemos por hoy en este tema, pero es definitivamente un tema que deberíamos tomar ojo, especialmente como mencionastes la situación alla , especialmente con la represión que se está dando con los sindicatos en actualidad es algo muy serio y que debe cambiar.

De todas formas, muchas gracias Frank por hablar sobre esta situación.

HAMMER: Y muchas gracias tambien, le agradesco mucho

WILPERT: Y gracias por ver the Real News Network.

End

DISCLAIMER: Please note that transcripts for The Real News Network are typed from a recording of the program. TRNN cannot guarantee their complete accuracy.