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Reality Asserts Itself - Robert Johnson

Ugly Money Politics – Robert Johnson on Reality Asserts Itself (8/8)

June 17, 2014

Mr. Johnson says politicians dependent on campaign contributions from the wealthy are allowing finance to bankrupt Detroit and cities across the country

Has Capitalism Lost the Ability to Reform Itself? – Robert Johnson on Reality Asserts Itself (7/8)

June 16, 2014

Capitalism is not rebalancing; the yearnings and desires of large portions of society are not being responded to

A Civilized Critic of Savage Behavior – Robert Johnson on Reality Asserts Itself (6/8)

June 15, 2014

Mr. Johnson says the compulsive pressure of money in politics has led to an abandonment of rules other than rules which transfer risk onto the back of the public

Heads, Finance Wins, Tails, Society Loses – Robert Johnson on Reality Asserts Itself (5/8)

June 13, 2014

Mr. Johnson says TARP was an abomination; finance controls government and uses it to cover its losses

How We Broke the Bank of England – Robert Johnson on Reality Asserts Itself (4/8)

June 12, 2014

Mr. Johnson says, “I used to tell my dad, if I’m fortunate enough to see St. Peter and get through the gate, I’m not going to get in because I helped knock off the British pound”

Finance Is Building the Architecture of Their Own Rules – Robert Johnson on Reality Asserts Itself (3/8)

June 10, 2014

On Reality Asserts Itself, Mr. Johnson says the scale of the political investment of finance – six, seven hundred million dollars – is overwhelming. With the political power of finance, do we still have a democracy?

Reaganomics Was Crazy – Robert Johnson on Reality Asserts Itself (2/8)

June 9, 2014

Mr. Johnson says the idea that you were going to cut taxes massively and this was going to lead to a growth in revenue and close the deficit was silly

Growing Up in the Cauldron of 1960’s Detroit – Robert Johnson on Reality Asserts Itself (1/8)

June 8, 2014

Mr. Johnson, who while working with George Soros “broke the Bank of England”, talks about growing up in the turmoil of racial tension and the mass movement against the Vietnam War